Spider

A spider spins its silk by releasing a liquid through its spinnerets.  The liquid hardens into a silk thread as soon as it touches the air.

Spiders are small, eight-legged animals that are best known for the silken webs they spin.

Spiders have spinning organs called spinnerets on the underside of their stomachs.  Through the spinnerets, spiders release a liquid that hardens to silk as soon as it touches the air.

The spider cannot force the silk from its silk glands in a stream.  When it is spinning a web it pulls the silk from the spinnerets with a hind leg.

Spiders use their silk in many ways.  Some spin webs to catch insects for fond.  They also line their retreats and nests with it.

Most spiders enclose their eggs in a protective eggs sac, or cocoon of silk.  The newly hatched spider lings may migrate to new homes by spinning silken, gossamer threads carried by the wind.

The spider traits a dragline wherever, it goes.  It can swing down to the ground from high places or swing out of reach of any enemy.  – Dick Rogers

About these ads