Posts from the ‘Long Tongue’ Category

Why do snakes stick out their tongues?

Snake Tongue

The old belief that a snake stings with its tongue isn’t true.  The flickering tongue is actually a delicate sense organ that helps the snake to smell.  A snake’s tongue is long and forked at the end.  It darts through a small hole in the front of the snake’s mouth.

As the snake moves along the ground, its flickering tongue senses odors in the air.  The tongue relays the information to special organs in the mouth which are linked to the snake’s sense of smell.  By picking up the odors, the tongue helps the snake to locate food and sense the presence of enemies. – Dick Rogers

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What is a giant anteater?

Giant Anteater

The giant anteater is an animal that lives in the forests of tropical America.  This toothless animal feeds mainly on ants and termites.  Its tube-like snout is more than a foot long, but its mouth is no wider than the head of a thumbtack.

The anteater gets its meal by ripping open ant and termite nests with its strong claws. Then it pokes out its long, sticky tongue and slurps up the insects it uncovers.  It may eat many thousands of insects at one meal.  The anteater has no permanent home.  It wanders alone searching for food, stepping only to curl up and sleep. – Dick Rogers

What is an aardvark?

Aardvark

The aardvark is an African animal that feeds on ants and termites.

The aardvark is one of Africa’s strangest creatures.   Its strange name comes from the old Dutch words meaning “earth pig.”  In some ways “earth Pig” is a good name, for its body is shaped much like a pig’s, and it spends most of the day curled up in its cool underground den.

But the aardvark is not like a pig in any other way.  An aardvark’s front feet are provided with powerful claws, which it uses to open termite and ant nests.

Then it pushes out its long tongue, which is like a flat, sticky worm more than a foot long.  It licks up the ants it  uncovers.  The ants stick to the aardvark’s sticky tongue as if it were flypaper, and the aardvark slurps the ants into its mouth.

Then it pokes its long tongue down into the winding tunnels to find more ants to eat.  It may eat many thousands of ants in one meal.

While it is eating, the aardvark’s thick, leathery skin protects it from the angry bites of the ants.

Although they look clumsy, aardvarks are not easy to catch, for in a few minutes they can dig a hole deep enough to escape from enemies. – Dick Rogers

How do bees make honey?

Bees

It is a mistake to image that bees get readymade honey from flowers.  The honeybees make honey from nectar, the sweet juice found in blossoms.

The reason bees make honey is that it serves them as food.

To make honey, the honey bee sips the sweet nectar from blossoms with its long tongue, and stores it in its honey stomach.

Inside its honey stomach the bee adds special chemicals to the nectar.  The bee puts the treated nectar into a wax cell in the honeycomb, where it ripens into honey.

The bees that gather nectar also gather pollen from the blossoms.  Pollen, too, makes good bee food.

The dusty pollen from the blossoms brushes off upon the bee’s hairy body.  The bee scrapes it off with its legs and moistens it with a little nectar to make a clump, and then pushes it into pollen baskets on its back legs.

Bee pollen is sometimes called “bee bread,” and with pollen bees help plants bear good fruit and seeds.  They help the plants by carrying pollen from one flower to another of the same kind. – Dick Rogers

How does a frog catch its food?

Frog

All summer long, the little frog squats, motionless, on the bank of a quiet pond or brook and watches for passing insects.

If a fly or cricket passes within reach, the frog’s long tongue will snap out like a flickering ship, so fast that you can scarcely follow the action.  The insect is caught on the sticky tip.  Just as quick as the frog flips its tongue back into its mouth.

The frog’s tongue is fastened at the front of its mouth, not the back, so that it can be flipped out a long way.  The frog’s mouth is equipped with feeble, practically useless teeth,  which are present only in the upper jaw.  So it must live mostly on small creatures that it can swallow in one gulp.

Frogs also eat earthworms, spiders and winnows that they catch in the water.  Toads capture their food in much the same way as frogs do.

Frogs and toads help man by sailing many harmful insects to be found in gardens and on farms.  – Dick Rogers

 

How does a frog catch its food?

Frog

The frogs catches insects and other small food animals on the sticky tip of its long tongue.

All summer long, the little frog squats, motionless, on the bank of a quiet pond or brook and watches for passing insects.  If a fly or cricket passes within reach, the frog’s long tongue will snap out like a flickering whip, so fast that you can scarcely follow the action.

The insect is caught on the sticky tip.  Just as quickly the frog flips its tongue back into its mouth.

The frog’s tongue is fastened at the front of its mouth, not the back, so that it can be flipped out a long way.  The frog’s mouth is equipped with feeble, practically useless teeth, which are present only in the upper jaw.  So it must live mostly on small creatures that it can swallow in one gulp.

Frogs also eat earthworms, spiders and minnows that they catch in the water.  Toads capture their food in much of same way frogs do.  Frogs and toads help man by eating many harmful insects to be found in gardens and on farms. – Dick Rogers