Posts from the ‘Sharp Claws’ Category

Why do cats retract their claws?

Cats retract their claws in order to keep them sharp for catching mice and other prey.  A cat has a special movable joint at the end of its toes that enables the claws to move in and out.  The claws move out when they are needed.  When not in use, the cat conceals its claws in little sheaths on its toes and walks softly on the pads of its feet.  Claws that can be pulled back so that the sharp points are protected are called retractile claws.  Cats sharpen their claws by raking them on furniture and free trunks to remove any ragged edged on the claws.–Dick Rogers

How can a fly walk on a ceiling?

Two sharp claws and sticky pad under each foot help the fly cling to ceilings and other smooth surfaces.  If you were to look at the feet of fly through a microscope, you would see that each foot is equipped with tiny claws and sticky pads of hair.

These enable the fly to walk upside down on the ceiling and cling to the slippery surfaces of windows and mirrors.

Fly Insect

When walking upside down, the fly picks up three of the feet at a time, while the other feet hold the fly to the ceiling until it is their turn to step forward.

Flies have great strength for their size and can run along a ceiling with the greatest of ease.

Most kinds of spiders and insects have claws on their feet that help them cling to ceilings and smooth walls.

Wherever the spider goes it lays down a thin, silken dragline, to help prevent falls or to escape from enemies.

If danger threatens, it can drop to the floor below, or it can simply hang there until the danger has passed.  Then it climbs back up on its dragline and continues on its way.   any of the duty cobwebs you see hanging from the ceiling are discarded draglines. – Dick Rogers

 

 

 

Are cats afraid of water?

Cat

Cats are not afraid of water.  They can even swim when they must.  But most cats do not like baths, or being chilled with water.

A cat spends much time grooming itself, using its rough tongue as a washcloth to “bathe” its body.

The tongue can reach almost everywhere except the head and neck.

The cat licks a paw and washes its face and head with a wet pay.  It is soiled with something that only a bath will clean off.

The cat’s all-purpose tongue also serves as a spoon when drinking milk.  It take four or five laps before swallowing.  Its rough surface helps file bits of meat from bones.  All cats are hunters.

Their sharp claws help them catch rats, mice, gophers and other animals.  A hunter that must get close enough to its prey to pounce on it must be spotlessly clean and have no odor to warm its victim. – Dick Rogers

 

What are koala bears?

The koala bear is a small, wooly animal found only in Australia.

The koala looks for all the world like a cuddly, live teddy bear.  It is about two-feet long, with ears seeming as if they were stuck on, and with a

Koala

patent-leather nose and shoe button eyes.  In fact, koalas are popularly known as Australian teddy bears.

They are not real bears, of course.  They are pouched animals.  Baby koalas are carried in a pouch when they are fist born.

A koala makes its home in a special king of tree—the eucalyptus or blue gum tree.  It holds onto the tree branches with its sharp claws and feeds on the oily leaves.  At one time you could see many koalas in zoos, but now there are only a few.

The koalas were hunted for their fur until they were in danger of disappearing from the world.

Today koalas are protected.  No one is allowed to take them out of Australia any more.  – Dick Rogers

What is a pangolin?

Pangolin

Pangolin (pronounced pang GOH lin) is a strange animal inhabiting the warm parts of Asia and Africa.  Pangolin are perhaps better known as “scaly ant-eaters,” for they are just that.

The pangolin’s body is covered with sharp, horny scales that give the animal the appearance of a large pine cone.  The pangolin wanders about at night in search of anthills and termite nests, which it rips open with its strong, sharp claws.

Then it pushes out its sticky, wormlike tongue which may be a foot long.  It licks up the ants it uncovers and slurps the ants into its toothless mouth.  It may eat many thousands of ants at one meal.

When danger threatens the pangolin rolls itself up into a tight ball so heavily armored that few enemies can harm it.  When rolled up, the pangolin is almost impossible to straighten out.  Pangolins may grow to be from 3 to 5 feet long. – Dick Rogers

What is a kinkajou?

Kinkajou

A Kinkajous (pronounced KINK  kuh joo) is a small animal that lives in the forests of Central and South American.

The kinkajou is about the size of a cat and somewhat resembles a monkey.  It has large eyes, soft, woolly, yellowish-brown fur, and a long grasping tail that can be used to hold on to limbs.

The native regard the kinkajou as a kind of monkey, but the paws are paws, not hands, and they are armed with sharp claws, not nails.

Kinkajous spend most of their lives in trees.  They hide in tree during the day and feed at night on fruits, insects, and honey.

When feeding, they call to each other in a shrill scream.  It is so loud that it can be heard nearly a mile away.

A kinkajou litter usually consists of one or two young.  By the time the cubs are seven weeks old they can hang by their tails.

Young kinkajous raised in captivity become very tame and are said to make delightful pets. – Dick Rogers