Posts from the ‘Young Water Flea’ Category

Is there a dog that can’t bark?

Tikoy

The breed of dog called the “basenji” (buh SEN jee) does not bark at all.  It is small, with perky ears and the habits of washing itself like a cat.  It is commonly known as the “barkless dog.”  The basenji can make noises, however.  It can snarl, growl, and whine, and when excited, it makes a kind of yodeling sound.

Because it isn’t a noisy dog, the basenji is popular as a house pet.  Basenjis originated in Africa as hunting dogs, where their keen sense of smell, intelligence and silence were useful for tracking prey.  You’ll never catch a basenji “barking up the wrong tree!” – Dick Rogers

How do barnacles get on a ship’s hull?

Barnacles on Ship Hull

Barnacles can swim at birth.  When they reach adult stage, they attach themselves to objects in the water and grow a shell.

If you have ever visited a seacoast where there were rocks and piers you have almost certainly seen barnacles, for the “crush” you saw on the wharf’s pilings and the rocks was made up of millions of salt water shellfish called barnacles.

When barnacle is first hatched, it resembles a young water flea and can swim about in the water.

But when it reaches adult stage it can no longer swim, so it attaches itself to any convenient object, such as the hull of a ship, piling, rock, whale, or even a sting of seaweed.

Once attached, a hard lime-like shell  forms around the barnacles.  The barnacle eats by waving its feathery legs through an opening in the shell to pull tiny sea creatures and plants into its mouth.

In olden days, sailor of wooden sailing ships had to periodically pull their ships ashore to scrape off the masses of barnacles clinging to the hulls, because they reduced the ship’s speed and made steering difficult.  Today, special paints, prevent growth of barnacles. – Dick Rogers