Posts tagged ‘Bees’

Where do bees go in the winter?

Bees spend the winter huddled together in their hives.  Inside the hive, the bees move about slowly, eating the extra honey that they stored during the busy summer season, and buzzing their wings to keep warm.  If a bee becomes too cold, it cannot move and thus, soon dies.

Before the end of winter, the queen bee begins to lay eggs again, and in the spring, all the busy activities of the hive are resumed.  In warm climates, however, where there is something in flower the year round, honeybees remains active, making honey in every season.–Dick Rogers

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Where do insects go in the winter?

Tiny Living Things

Many insects die when winter approaches.  But some live through the cold by hibernating.

Have you noticed that insects seems to disappears in the fall?  Where do the butterflies and bees go during the winter?

Cold weather sends the ant scurrying into its underground home.

The cricket sleeps all winter in a little crack in the ground.  We say it hibernates.

Some other insects hibernate, too.  The moth caterpillar spends the winter wrapped, snuggly in its cocoon.  By spring, it has changed into a moth, which breaks out of the cocoon and flies away.

In the fall, the orange and black monarch butterfly flies south to warmer country.  It migrates.

Ladybugs migrates, too

Bumblebees die at the end of summer and only the queen bumblebee lives through the winter to start in new colony in the spring.

Honeybees are luckier.  They huddle together for warmth in their beehive and eat the honey they collected during  the summer.

Most other insects die with the first frosts, but they leave behind large numbers of insect eggs to hatch in the spring.  – Dick Rogers

How do bees make honey?

Bees

It is a mistake to image that bees get readymade honey from flowers.  The honeybees make honey from nectar, the sweet juice found in blossoms.

The reason bees make honey is that it serves them as food.

To make honey, the honey bee sips the sweet nectar from blossoms with its long tongue, and stores it in its honey stomach.

Inside its honey stomach the bee adds special chemicals to the nectar.  The bee puts the treated nectar into a wax cell in the honeycomb, where it ripens into honey.

The bees that gather nectar also gather pollen from the blossoms.  Pollen, too, makes good bee food.

The dusty pollen from the blossoms brushes off upon the bee’s hairy body.  The bee scrapes it off with its legs and moistens it with a little nectar to make a clump, and then pushes it into pollen baskets on its back legs.

Bee pollen is sometimes called “bee bread,” and with pollen bees help plants bear good fruit and seeds.  They help the plants by carrying pollen from one flower to another of the same kind. – Dick Rogers

How do paper wasps make their paper?

Paper wasps build their nests out of paper.  The paper wasp makes its paper by chewing tiny pieces of wood and mixing the pulp with saliva in this mouth.

The wet paper paste is then patted, pulled and stretched to form rows of cells, like those of a bee’s honeycomb.  When the pulp dries, it becomes paper—something like the paper your newspaper is made of.

Paper Wasp

Each cell in the paper wasp’s nest  is a nursery in which a baby wasp will grow.  Hornets and yellow jackets make paper nests, too.

The paper nests are sometimes hung from tree branches or stuck beneath the rafter of an old barn.  They may also be built in the holes in the ground.

Not all wasps make paper nests.  The carpenter wasp bores holes in trees or old posts.  The mud wasp builds a nest of mud.  The cuckoo wasp doesn’t build a nest.  It lays its eggs in a mud wasp’s nest while the occupant is away. – Dick Rogers