Posts tagged ‘Bushy Tail’

What is a wolverine?

The wolverine is the largest member of the weasel family, weighing up to thirty pounds.  With its dark, shaggy hair and short bushy tail, the wolverine looks something like a small bear.  It lives in northern forests.

It has a skunk-like scent for defense and is sometimes called a “skunk bear.”

Wolverine

For its size, the wolverine is unequaled in appetite and craftiness, and is the trapper’s worst enemy.

During the winter, the wolverine follows the trapper’s footsteps and skillfully steals the bait from the traps set for more valuable animals, or eats the animals caught in the trap.

The wolverine not only robs the trapper of his bait and catch, but may even sneak into the trapper’s cabin, eat his food and steal anything in sight, including rifles, axes, dishes, even blankets, all of which it carries away and buries.

It repays his “host” by leaving the cabin uninhabitable by its foul smell.

Because they have been hunted ruthlessly, wolverines have become rare in North America and are seldom seen enough of Canada today. – Dick Rogers

 

How do flying squirrels fly?

Flying-squirrel

Squirrels don’t have wings, but the flying squirrel seems to fly, though not like a bird.  It just glides from tree to tree in search of food.

The flying squirrel has folds of skin between its front and back feet.

When it leaps into space from a high limb, the flying squirrel spreads its feet wide.

The parachute-like folds of skin connecting its feet stretch out and convert the flying squirrel into a tiny living glider.  It can glide a downward angle as far as 125 feet.

Twisting and banking with the aid of its bushy tail, the flying squirrel guides itself to the trunk of another tree.

The flight ends as the squirrel lands upright on the tree to climb again for the next gliding leap.

Flying squirrels can be found living in the forests of North America, Asia and Europe.

During the day they sleep in nests hidden in tree hollows.  They come out at night to hunt for berries, insects, and nuts.  – Dick Rogers