Posts tagged ‘Cattle’

What are a cow’s horns made of?

Cow’s Horn

A cow’s horns are made up mostly of special growth of touch skin material called “keratin.”  The nails on your fingers and toes are made of this materials.  So are the claws and hooves of animals.  The horns keep growing throughout the animal’s life.

Since cattle can use their horns as weapons, they are sometimes dehorned to make them safer for cattlemen to handle.  The cattle are also less likely to injure each other.  Some breeds do not grow horns.  Cattle born without horns, or whose horns are removed, and called “polled” cattle. – Dick Rogers

Why do cows chew their cuds?

A cow’s stomach has four parts.  It must chew its food twice before the food can be digested.

Cattle have the habit of swallowing their food and later bringing it back to the mouth to be rechewed.  Hence they are called “ cud-chewing” animals.

The cow has an end way of digesting its food.  A cow’s stomach is divided into four compartments.  Each compartment helps digest the food the cow eats.

Cow

While a cow is grazing it chews its food only slightly.  When the food is first, swallowed, it goes into the first compartment of the stomach where it is moistened.

From there it passes into the second compartment.  Have the food forms into a soft ball called a cud.  Later, when the cow is resting, the cud moves back up in the cow’s mouth to be chewed thoroughly.

This time, when the food is swallowed, it passes into the third and fourth compartments when real digestion takes place.

Animals that chew cuds and have this kind of stomach are called ruminants.  Ox, deer sheep, goats and antelope are ruminants.  – Dick Rogers

 

What Is A Brahman Cattle?

Brahman Cattle

The Brahman is a breed of hump-shouldered cattle with drooping necks and large, floppy ears.

In the United States, Brahmans are sometimes called Brahman.  In other countries, they are known by the common name of zebu (pronounced ZEE boo).

Brahman’s hump is mostly a large, fatty growth that rises above the shoulders.  Brahmans were brought to the United States from India.  Because they are able to tolerate heat and refuse to accept insects and disease better than other cattle.

Brahmans are often crossed with other cattle to create new kinds of cattle that need these behavior.

Brahma bull-riding is a popular event at a rodeo.  The only equipment is a loose rope around the bull’s shoulders and a clanging bell attached below.

The rider must hold on with only one hand in his wild ride. – Dick Roger