Posts tagged ‘Cricket’

How does a cricket make its chirping sound?

Cricket

Perhaps the most familiar summer sound-maker of the insect world is the cricket.  The common field cricket chirps from grasses in  your backyard or from behind is warm stove in your house.  Because it has no voice, the cricket must fiddle.

It makes its chirping call by raising one wing like a violin bow and drawing it ever a file-like edge on the other wing.  It is the male who makes all the noise.

The female cricket is quiet.  The male’s loud fiddling is done to attract the female cricket.  She listens to his song with “ears” located on her front legs.–Dick Rogers

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How do crickets sing?

Cricket

Crickets chirp away merrily by rubbing their rough wings together.

The cheerful songs that crickets chirp have inspired the popular expression “as merry as a cricket.”  Actually, a cricket doesn’t “sing.”  A cricket fiddles its chirping note by rubbing its wings together.

The wing edges are rough where they overlap.  The chirping noise is produced by rubbing the rough edges briskly together.  In this manner, the boy cricket fiddles courtship songs to a girl cricket.

His chirps also serve to warn away enemies.  Crickets have keen ears, which are located on their legs instead of their heads.

The little pale-green tree cricket has the clearest and most musical notes of all.  It lives high in trees and bushes, and is sometimes called a “thermometer cricket” because of its ability to report the temperature.  It chirps faster as the temperature rises.

If you live where there are crickets, you can find the temperature by counting the member of chirps a cricket makes in 15 seconds and adding 39 to the number. – Dick Rogers

Where do insects go in the winter?

Tiny Living Things

Many insects die when winter approaches.  But some live through the cold by hibernating.

Have you noticed that insects seems to disappears in the fall?  Where do the butterflies and bees go during the winter?

Cold weather sends the ant scurrying into its underground home.

The cricket sleeps all winter in a little crack in the ground.  We say it hibernates.

Some other insects hibernate, too.  The moth caterpillar spends the winter wrapped, snuggly in its cocoon.  By spring, it has changed into a moth, which breaks out of the cocoon and flies away.

In the fall, the orange and black monarch butterfly flies south to warmer country.  It migrates.

Ladybugs migrates, too

Bumblebees die at the end of summer and only the queen bumblebee lives through the winter to start in new colony in the spring.

Honeybees are luckier.  They huddle together for warmth in their beehive and eat the honey they collected during  the summer.

Most other insects die with the first frosts, but they leave behind large numbers of insect eggs to hatch in the spring.  – Dick Rogers

How does a frog catch its food?

Frog

All summer long, the little frog squats, motionless, on the bank of a quiet pond or brook and watches for passing insects.

If a fly or cricket passes within reach, the frog’s long tongue will snap out like a flickering ship, so fast that you can scarcely follow the action.  The insect is caught on the sticky tip.  Just as quick as the frog flips its tongue back into its mouth.

The frog’s tongue is fastened at the front of its mouth, not the back, so that it can be flipped out a long way.  The frog’s mouth is equipped with feeble, practically useless teeth,  which are present only in the upper jaw.  So it must live mostly on small creatures that it can swallow in one gulp.

Frogs also eat earthworms, spiders and winnows that they catch in the water.  Toads capture their food in much the same way as frogs do.

Frogs and toads help man by sailing many harmful insects to be found in gardens and on farms.  – Dick Rogers

 

How does a frog catch its food?

Frog

The frogs catches insects and other small food animals on the sticky tip of its long tongue.

All summer long, the little frog squats, motionless, on the bank of a quiet pond or brook and watches for passing insects.  If a fly or cricket passes within reach, the frog’s long tongue will snap out like a flickering whip, so fast that you can scarcely follow the action.

The insect is caught on the sticky tip.  Just as quickly the frog flips its tongue back into its mouth.

The frog’s tongue is fastened at the front of its mouth, not the back, so that it can be flipped out a long way.  The frog’s mouth is equipped with feeble, practically useless teeth, which are present only in the upper jaw.  So it must live mostly on small creatures that it can swallow in one gulp.

Frogs also eat earthworms, spiders and minnows that they catch in the water.  Toads capture their food in much of same way frogs do.  Frogs and toads help man by eating many harmful insects to be found in gardens and on farms. – Dick Rogers