Posts tagged ‘Earthworms’

Why do geese fly in a ‘V’ formation?

Geese are web-footed birds closely related to ducks and swans.

Wild geese sometimes fly in the familiar V shaped formation when moving to or from their breeding grounds in the Far North.

We can only guess why the geese fly in this formation.  One idea is that the geese follow a leading on their flights.

Geese

Because its eyes are located on the sides of its head it would be easier for a goose to see the other geese in this formation.

The goose at the front of the triangle is a wise old gander which knows the traditional route, with its various safe stopovers.

The term “silly goose” does not apply to these handsome birds.

Geese are cautious and very intelligent birds.

While on the ground, they seem to post sentinels to stand guard against danger while the flock feeds.

The Canada goose is probably the best-know goose of North America.  A large Canada gander may measure well over 3 feet, have a wingspan of over 6 feet and weigh up to 13 pounds. – Dick Rogers

 

How does a frog catch its food?

Frog

All summer long, the little frog squats, motionless, on the bank of a quiet pond or brook and watches for passing insects.

If a fly or cricket passes within reach, the frog’s long tongue will snap out like a flickering ship, so fast that you can scarcely follow the action.  The insect is caught on the sticky tip.  Just as quick as the frog flips its tongue back into its mouth.

The frog’s tongue is fastened at the front of its mouth, not the back, so that it can be flipped out a long way.  The frog’s mouth is equipped with feeble, practically useless teeth,  which are present only in the upper jaw.  So it must live mostly on small creatures that it can swallow in one gulp.

Frogs also eat earthworms, spiders and winnows that they catch in the water.  Toads capture their food in much the same way as frogs do.

Frogs and toads help man by sailing many harmful insects to be found in gardens and on farms.  – Dick Rogers

 

How does the earthworm dig its hole?

Earthworm

Earthworms are worms that live in warm and moist places throughout the world.

As anyone can guess from their name, earthworms live in the ground.  The earthworm digs its burrow by actually eating its way through the soil.

As the worm digs, it swallows the dirt and digests the decaying plant and food matter in the dirt.

The soil passes through the earthworm’s long body and is left on the ground in little heaps of dirt balls, called castings.  Thus the earthworm makes a home for itself and gets its meals at the same time.

Earthworms are good friends to farmers and gardeners.  By digging burrows, earthworms leave tiny holes in the ground which make it easy for air and water to get to plant roots.

The castings of the worms help keep the soil rich for growing plants.

The earthworm is sometimes called an angleworm or fishworm, because it is a popular bait used by fishermen. – Dick Rogers

How does a frog catch its food?

Frog

The frogs catches insects and other small food animals on the sticky tip of its long tongue.

All summer long, the little frog squats, motionless, on the bank of a quiet pond or brook and watches for passing insects.  If a fly or cricket passes within reach, the frog’s long tongue will snap out like a flickering whip, so fast that you can scarcely follow the action.

The insect is caught on the sticky tip.  Just as quickly the frog flips its tongue back into its mouth.

The frog’s tongue is fastened at the front of its mouth, not the back, so that it can be flipped out a long way.  The frog’s mouth is equipped with feeble, practically useless teeth, which are present only in the upper jaw.  So it must live mostly on small creatures that it can swallow in one gulp.

Frogs also eat earthworms, spiders and minnows that they catch in the water.  Toads capture their food in much of same way frogs do.  Frogs and toads help man by eating many harmful insects to be found in gardens and on farms. – Dick Rogers