Posts tagged ‘Eggs’

How many eggs does a chicken lay in a year?

A typical egg-laying hen can lay as many as 250 eggs a year.  Egg-laying hens, call pullets, begin laying eggs when they are about five months old.  On a small farm, a chicken might lay eight to ten eggs in a nest and spend three weeks hatching them.

But on a large commercial egg farm, the eggs are taken away as soon as they are laid, and the chicken jus keeps laying.  Chickens produce the most eggs during their first laying year.  After a year or so, they are usually sold as stewing chickens, and the egg farmer buys a new flock of pullets.–Dick Rogers

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Where do bees go in the winter?

Bees spend the winter huddled together in their hives.  Inside the hive, the bees move about slowly, eating the extra honey that they stored during the busy summer season, and buzzing their wings to keep warm.  If a bee becomes too cold, it cannot move and thus, soon dies.

Before the end of winter, the queen bee begins to lay eggs again, and in the spring, all the busy activities of the hive are resumed.  In warm climates, however, where there is something in flower the year round, honeybees remains active, making honey in every season.–Dick Rogers

How does a spider spin its silk?

Spider

A spider spins its silk by releasing a liquid through its spinnerets.  The liquid hardens into a silk thread as soon as it touches the air.

Spiders are small, eight-legged animals that are best known for the silken webs they spin.

Spiders have spinning organs called spinnerets on the underside of their stomachs.  Through the spinnerets, spiders release a liquid that hardens to silk as soon as it touches the air.

The spider cannot force the silk from its silk glands in a stream.  When it is spinning a web it pulls the silk from the spinnerets with a hind leg.

Spiders use their silk in many ways.  Some spin webs to catch insects for fond.  They also line their retreats and nests with it.

Most spiders enclose their eggs in a protective eggs sac, or cocoon of silk.  The newly hatched spider lings may migrate to new homes by spinning silken, gossamer threads carried by the wind.

The spider traits a dragline wherever, it goes.  It can swing down to the ground from high places or swing out of reach of any enemy.  – Dick Rogers

How are butterflies born?

Birth of a Butterfly

Every butterfly goes through four stages in its life.  These four stages are eggs, larva, pupa and adult.

The story of the butterfly begins when the female lays her eggs on a plant that the young insects will use as food.

From each eggs hatches a tiny larva called a caterpillar.  It is hard to believe that this wormlike creature will turn into a graceful butterfly.

The caterpillar is always hungry, and spends most of its life eating and growing.  It grows to fast that it outgrows and sheds its skin several times.  When the caterpillar has reached its full growth, it is ready to turn into a pupa.

The caterpillar spins a button of silk on a twig or leaf and hooks itself to the button.  Hanging head down, it sheds its old caterpillar skin.  Not it is a pupa.  The pupa’s soft skin hardens to form a case called a chrysalis.

Protected by the chrysalis, the pupa changes into a butterfly.

After about two or more weeks, the chrysalis spills open and the adult butterfly emerges its limp, moist wings spread and dry.  Then it flies away.

Did you know that a tadpole becomes a frog?

The common pond frog’s life begins in a quiet pond as one of many jelly-like eggs laid together in a mass by the mother frog.

In a few days, the egg hatched into a tiny, legless tadpole that breathes with gills, as fish do.  it has a long tail which it uses for swimming, and eat plants that grow in the water.

Tadpole-to-frog

As the tadpole grows, first two hind legs and then two front legs appears.  After a time the tail begins to shrink and the tadpole loses its gills and gets lungs instead.

Then the tadpole comes to the surfaces of the water to breath air.

At last its tail disappears and the change is complete.

As a young frog, the creature is now ready to leave the water and begin a life as a hoping land animal.

Most tadpole make the change into frogs in the three months of spring.  Most toads begin life a tadpole, much like frogs do. – Dick Rogers

 

How do paper wasps make their paper?

Paper wasps build their nests out of paper.  The paper wasp makes its paper by chewing tiny pieces of wood and mixing the pulp with saliva in this mouth.

The wet paper paste is then patted, pulled and stretched to form rows of cells, like those of a bee’s honeycomb.  When the pulp dries, it becomes paper—something like the paper your newspaper is made of.

Paper Wasp

Each cell in the paper wasp’s nest  is a nursery in which a baby wasp will grow.  Hornets and yellow jackets make paper nests, too.

The paper nests are sometimes hung from tree branches or stuck beneath the rafter of an old barn.  They may also be built in the holes in the ground.

Not all wasps make paper nests.  The carpenter wasp bores holes in trees or old posts.  The mud wasp builds a nest of mud.  The cuckoo wasp doesn’t build a nest.  It lays its eggs in a mud wasp’s nest while the occupant is away. – Dick Rogers

 

What is a cuckoo?

Nearly everyone is familiar with the cuckoo clock which a small, wooden bird announces the hours “cuckoo, cuckoo.”

The clock bird is imitating the loud call of the European cuckoo, and ashy-gray bird about size of the small pigeon.

Cuckoo

“Cuckoo” is the name of several closely related birds that are found nearly all parts of the world.

Perhaps the most interesting thing about the cuckoo is that it builds no nest of its own but lays its eggs in the nests of other birds.

When the baby cuckoo hatches, the foster parents feed it as carefully as if it were their own.

Actually, not all cuckoos are guilty of this behavior.  Some cuckoos build untidy nests in quiet woodlands and care for their young.

Cuckoos are helpful to man.  They eat many insect pests such as hairy caterpillars.  Such insects are shunned by other birds because of the caterpillar irritating bristles.– Dick Rogers