Posts tagged ‘Frog’

What is salamander?

A salamander is a harmless creature that looks like a lizard, but it is related to the frogs and toads.

Salamanders’ bodies and long tails make them look so much like lizards that they are often mistaken for them.   It is easy to tell them apart.  Lizards are covered with dry scales.

Salamander

Salamander has smooth, shiny skin that always looks wet.  Salamanders are timid, harmless creature.  They love to live in streams and ponds, on land beneath stones and rotting logs where it is cool, dark and moist.

They live in a stream or a pond as tadpoles and breathe with gills like fish.  But when grown-up, they have  legs and come ashore and breathe air with lungs.  Salamanders have a special name because they start life in the water then crawl out onto land.  They are called “amphibians,” which means “leading a double life.”

There are many kinds of salamanders.  Mud puppies, newts, and hellbenders are the names of the few.  Not all salamander live a double life.  The mud puppies and hellbenders spend their entire life in the water.  – Dick Rogers

 

 

 

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How do frogs stay under water so long?

When under water, a frog takes in oxygen through its skin.  When a frog dives under water, he does not come to the  surface as quickly as you have to when you dive.  Why not?

Frog swimming underwater

The frog, of course, cannot breathe under water, as it did when it was a tadpole.  When a frog is on the bank or pond, it breathes with its lungs, which are somewhat like your lungs.

There is always some air mixed with water in the pond.  When the frog is under water, it can take a little of the air it needs through its skin.

This explains why the frog can stay under water all winter.

If you live where the winters are cold, you’ve probably noticed that the frogs seem to disappear when cold weather comes.

Many frogs dive into ponds and bury themselves in the muddy bottom, and quickly fall asleep.  Sleeping all winter is called “hibernation.”

While the frog is sleeping, its body keeps so still that it can get along without any fresh air until it wakes in the spring.  During its winter sleep, the frog lives on the food stored in its fat body.  – Dick Rogers

Did you know that a tadpole becomes a frog?

The common pond frog’s life begins in a quiet pond as one of many jelly-like eggs laid together in a mass by the mother frog.

In a few days, the egg hatched into a tiny, legless tadpole that breathes with gills, as fish do.  it has a long tail which it uses for swimming, and eat plants that grow in the water.

Tadpole-to-frog

As the tadpole grows, first two hind legs and then two front legs appears.  After a time the tail begins to shrink and the tadpole loses its gills and gets lungs instead.

Then the tadpole comes to the surfaces of the water to breath air.

At last its tail disappears and the change is complete.

As a young frog, the creature is now ready to leave the water and begin a life as a hoping land animal.

Most tadpole make the change into frogs in the three months of spring.  Most toads begin life a tadpole, much like frogs do. – Dick Rogers

 

How does a frog catch its food?

Frog

All summer long, the little frog squats, motionless, on the bank of a quiet pond or brook and watches for passing insects.

If a fly or cricket passes within reach, the frog’s long tongue will snap out like a flickering ship, so fast that you can scarcely follow the action.  The insect is caught on the sticky tip.  Just as quick as the frog flips its tongue back into its mouth.

The frog’s tongue is fastened at the front of its mouth, not the back, so that it can be flipped out a long way.  The frog’s mouth is equipped with feeble, practically useless teeth,  which are present only in the upper jaw.  So it must live mostly on small creatures that it can swallow in one gulp.

Frogs also eat earthworms, spiders and winnows that they catch in the water.  Toads capture their food in much the same way as frogs do.

Frogs and toads help man by sailing many harmful insects to be found in gardens and on farms.  – Dick Rogers

 

How does a frog catch its food?

Frog

The frogs catches insects and other small food animals on the sticky tip of its long tongue.

All summer long, the little frog squats, motionless, on the bank of a quiet pond or brook and watches for passing insects.  If a fly or cricket passes within reach, the frog’s long tongue will snap out like a flickering whip, so fast that you can scarcely follow the action.

The insect is caught on the sticky tip.  Just as quickly the frog flips its tongue back into its mouth.

The frog’s tongue is fastened at the front of its mouth, not the back, so that it can be flipped out a long way.  The frog’s mouth is equipped with feeble, practically useless teeth, which are present only in the upper jaw.  So it must live mostly on small creatures that it can swallow in one gulp.

Frogs also eat earthworms, spiders and minnows that they catch in the water.  Toads capture their food in much of same way frogs do.  Frogs and toads help man by eating many harmful insects to be found in gardens and on farms. – Dick Rogers