Posts tagged ‘Fur’

Why do moths eat clothes?

Moth

Some moths eat clothes because that is their food.  Actually, it is not the adult moth that does the damage.  The eaters are the caterpillar stage of the moth.  They especially like wool and fur.  The female moth lays her soft, white eggs on clothing and carpets.

When the eggs hatch, the hungry little caterpillars begin to eat whatever material they rest on.  The caterpillar has strong biting jaws that can chew cloth and fur.  When the insect changes into a winged adult, its mouth changes, too, and it no longer has any desire to feed on clothes.–Dick Rogers

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Why do geese fly in a ‘V’ formation?

Geese are web-footed birds closely related to ducks and swans.

Wild geese sometimes fly in the familiar V shaped formation when moving to or from their breeding grounds in the Far North.

We can only guess why the geese fly in this formation.  One idea is that the geese follow a leading on their flights.

Geese

Because its eyes are located on the sides of its head it would be easier for a goose to see the other geese in this formation.

The goose at the front of the triangle is a wise old gander which knows the traditional route, with its various safe stopovers.

The term “silly goose” does not apply to these handsome birds.

Geese are cautious and very intelligent birds.

While on the ground, they seem to post sentinels to stand guard against danger while the flock feeds.

The Canada goose is probably the best-know goose of North America.  A large Canada gander may measure well over 3 feet, have a wingspan of over 6 feet and weigh up to 13 pounds. – Dick Rogers

 

What is a mongoose?

Mongoose

Mongoose are weasel like creatures found in India, Africa and some other countries.

Only little larger than house cats, mongooses are famous as snake killers, especially of cobras.

In “Rikki-tikki-tavi” Rudyard Kipling tells the story of a little mongoose that kills a king cobra, on of the most poisonous snakes in the world.

Actually, the mongoose only attacks a cobra when it is hungry.  When it gets within striking range, the mongoose bristles out its fur and makes feint, leaping forward and away to provoke the snake into striking.

The mongoose is not immune to the cobra’s poison.  It simply depends on its speed to dodge the cobra’s deadly fangs.

Then, with perfect timing, the mongoose pounces on the snake before it has a chance to strike again and cracks its head with a powerful bite.  Mongoose also catches rats, mice, and other small animals.  – Dick Rogers

What is a duck-billed platypus?

It would be hard to find a stronger creature in the world than the duck-billed platypus that lives in Australia and Tasmania.  It is also the strangest creature.

What makes this “impossible” creature so odd is that it has a bill like a duck, where most other mammals have noses and lips.  It has the soft thick fur of a mole, and a paddle-shaped tall like a beaver.

Duck Billed-Platypus

It has webbed feet, too, and it lays eggs and hatches them like a chicken.  But after the eggs have hatched, the mother platypus nurses her babies with milk as do other mammals.

A fully grown duckbill may be nearly two feet long counting its tail, and weight 6 pounds.  This shy creature spend most of the day hiding in a grass-lined den, deep in some mud bank.

Like beavers, platypuses live in streams and ponds.  they do not build dams, but dig deep tunnels far into the bank, from under water.  The long upward-sloping tunnel leads to the “living room.”

The shy platypus is seldom seen.  it hides deep in its burrow by day.  It comes out at night to hunt for worms, snails, and other small water creatures which it digs up which it finds by stirring the muddy stream bottom of the pond with its rubbery bill. – Dick Rogers