Posts tagged ‘Hibernate’

Where do insects go in the winter?

Tiny Living Things

Many insects die when winter approaches.  But some live through the cold by hibernating.

Have you noticed that insects seems to disappears in the fall?  Where do the butterflies and bees go during the winter?

Cold weather sends the ant scurrying into its underground home.

The cricket sleeps all winter in a little crack in the ground.  We say it hibernates.

Some other insects hibernate, too.  The moth caterpillar spends the winter wrapped, snuggly in its cocoon.  By spring, it has changed into a moth, which breaks out of the cocoon and flies away.

In the fall, the orange and black monarch butterfly flies south to warmer country.  It migrates.

Ladybugs migrates, too

Bumblebees die at the end of summer and only the queen bumblebee lives through the winter to start in new colony in the spring.

Honeybees are luckier.  They huddle together for warmth in their beehive and eat the honey they collected during  the summer.

Most other insects die with the first frosts, but they leave behind large numbers of insect eggs to hatch in the spring.  – Dick Rogers

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Do bears hibernate?

The long winter nap is a famous bear habit.  Although most wild bears that live in cold northern lands sleep a great deal during the winter, they do not really hibernate.

Bears do not sleep soundly the whole time, as do the woodchuck and other true hibernators.

A loud noise can easily awaken a sleeping bear. The bear may even wake up and come out of its den on mild winter days.

Big Animal

A bear prepares for its winter sleep by eating so much food that it gets fat.  The fat helps nourish the bear’s body while it sleeps.

With the arrival of cold weather the bear stops eating and looks for a cave, a brush pile or a hollow in the base of a tree to use as a den.  The den protects the bear from the weather.

When spring comes, the bear is awakened by the change in temperature and by hunger.

Animals that sleep through the winter do so to reduce their need for food during the cold lean winter months. – Dick Rogers