Posts tagged ‘Mountains’

What is the difference between a cougar and a mountain lion?

Couger

The American mountain lion once ranged over much of North and South America, and was given many names.

Mountains lion, cougar, puma, catamount, panther, or painter.  If you have heard of one of these animals, then you know them all, for these are just some of the many names for the same animal – the mountain lion.

The tawny-colored mountain lion once roamed from the forests of Canada to the southern tip of South America.  It lived in mountains, deserts, forests, swamps, and prairies.

In South America, it is called a puma.  “Cougar” comes from the way French-speaking people pronounced the Indian word for mountain lion.

Catamount comes from an old New England expression, “cat-a-mountain.”  And “painter” comes from the way some people pronounced panther.

Mountain Lion

The mountain lion’s “roar” is a wild and tarrying scream.  Mountain lions also “talk” to each other with soft whistle calls.

Because it sometimes kills livestock, many people regard the big cat as an enemy to be destroyed.

In the United States today, the few remaining mountain lions are found only in the wildest areas of the West and in the dense Florida Everglades. – Dick Rogers

What are condors and where do they live?

Condor

Condors are large, dark vultures that can be found living high up in the remote parts of the California Mountains of North America, and in the higher mountains of South America.

A condor may grow to be over 4 feet long and have a wingspread of nearly 11 feet.  It is one of the largest flying birds in the world.  The condor is useful to man as an animal garbage collector.

It helps keep the ground clean by feeding on dead animals which otherwise might present a health danger.

Like all vultures, condors have small, naked heads and hooked beaks.  They have no voice, but hiss like a snake when disturbed.  Though ugly to look at, condors are powerful and graceful in flight.

They spend much of their time wheeling and circling high overhead searching for food.  Their remarkable eyesight can spy out the smallest dead animal from great heights.

Because their wings are so large and heavy, baby condors are nearly a year old before they have the strength to soar. – Dick Rogers