Posts tagged ‘Toad’

Why do toads have warts?

Toad

The warts on a toad’s back won’t give you warts if you touch them.  But you should be careful the way you handle the toad.  The bumps or “warts” on a toad’s skin are actually a collection of poison glands. When a toad is attacked, the lumpy glands in its skin let out and milky fluid that stings the mouth of any bigger animal that tires to eat the toad.

The poisonous glands can also sting your eyes and mouth if you rub them after picking up a toad.  The toad’s poisonous skin does not protect it against, all enemies.  Many snakes and birds regularly feed upon toads. – Dick Rogers

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What is salamander?

A salamander is a harmless creature that looks like a lizard, but it is related to the frogs and toads.

Salamanders’ bodies and long tails make them look so much like lizards that they are often mistaken for them.   It is easy to tell them apart.  Lizards are covered with dry scales.

Salamander

Salamander has smooth, shiny skin that always looks wet.  Salamanders are timid, harmless creature.  They love to live in streams and ponds, on land beneath stones and rotting logs where it is cool, dark and moist.

They live in a stream or a pond as tadpoles and breathe with gills like fish.  But when grown-up, they have  legs and come ashore and breathe air with lungs.  Salamanders have a special name because they start life in the water then crawl out onto land.  They are called “amphibians,” which means “leading a double life.”

There are many kinds of salamanders.  Mud puppies, newts, and hellbenders are the names of the few.  Not all salamander live a double life.  The mud puppies and hellbenders spend their entire life in the water.  – Dick Rogers

 

 

 

What is a horned toad?

Horned Toad

The horned toad is mis-named.  It is not a toad but a lizard.   The name “toad” comes from the toad like shape of its squat body.

The horns of the horned toad are sharp spines that stick out from its head.  Smaller spines cover its scaly body.  These spines give the creature its bristly appearance.

The spines protect the horned toad from being swallowed by hungry animals.  The horned toad dwells throughout the dry plains and deserts of North America.  A fully grown horned toad may be only a few inches long.

The color of the horned toads skin matches the sandy color of the desert and makes it hard to see.

When threatened, the horned toad quickly buries itself in the sand.  If it falls to do so in time it may squirt a thin yet of blood out of its eyelids to drive away its attack.

In some places, the horned toad is protected-because it eats harmful insects. – Dick Rogers

 

 

 

How does a frog catch its food?

Frog

The frogs catches insects and other small food animals on the sticky tip of its long tongue.

All summer long, the little frog squats, motionless, on the bank of a quiet pond or brook and watches for passing insects.  If a fly or cricket passes within reach, the frog’s long tongue will snap out like a flickering whip, so fast that you can scarcely follow the action.

The insect is caught on the sticky tip.  Just as quickly the frog flips its tongue back into its mouth.

The frog’s tongue is fastened at the front of its mouth, not the back, so that it can be flipped out a long way.  The frog’s mouth is equipped with feeble, practically useless teeth, which are present only in the upper jaw.  So it must live mostly on small creatures that it can swallow in one gulp.

Frogs also eat earthworms, spiders and minnows that they catch in the water.  Toads capture their food in much of same way frogs do.  Frogs and toads help man by eating many harmful insects to be found in gardens and on farms. – Dick Rogers