Posts tagged ‘Toes’

How do gecko lizards walk on ceilings?

Gecko has the ability to walk on walls and ceilings due to special adhesive pads on their feet.  These small lizards live in warm climates.  They have wide-spreading toes.

Each toe ends in a pad and hidden claw.  These toe pads, made up of thousands of tiny suction cups, enable the gecko to cling to any smooth surface—even glass.

The claws can be moved out like those of a can, and are used on rough surfaces.  The gecko’s grip is so good that it can scamper easily over walls, ceilings, and windowpanes while watching for insects and other prey.–Dick Rogers

What are a cow’s horns made of?

Cow’s Horn

A cow’s horns are made up mostly of special growth of touch skin material called “keratin.”  The nails on your fingers and toes are made of this materials.  So are the claws and hooves of animals.  The horns keep growing throughout the animal’s life.

Since cattle can use their horns as weapons, they are sometimes dehorned to make them safer for cattlemen to handle.  The cattle are also less likely to injure each other.  Some breeds do not grow horns.  Cattle born without horns, or whose horns are removed, and called “polled” cattle. – Dick Rogers

What Is a cassowary?

Cassowary

The cassowary is a large, odd-looking bird that lives in the thick forest of Australia and New Guinea.  A fully grown cassowary may be five feet tall and weigh two pounds or more.

Like the African relative the ostrich, the cassowary cannot fly.  All that remains of its flight feathers are a few spiny quilts, but it can sprint at speeds of at nearly 40 miles per hour for its long powerful legs, when it danger.

A bony helmet on its featherless head  helps it butt through the heavy underbrush.  Tough bristle like feathers that cover it body serve as a form of armor as it crashes headlong the forest.

A threatened cassowary can be a dangerous foe.  All three of the toes on each foot are armed with knife-sharp claws which can be a deadly weapon in a flight.  Usually, these shy birds are  heard more often than soon in their dense forest home.  They call by snorting and bellowing. – Dick Rogers