Posts tagged ‘Tongue’

How many eyes does a spider have?

Most spiders have eight eyes.  There are also six-eyed, four-eyed and two-eyed spiders.  Some species of spiders that live in cave and other dark places have no eyes at all.  A spider’s eyes are on the top and near the front of its head.

Even though a spider has so many eyes, it can only see things a few inches from its face.  To make up for their nearsightedness, spiders have a very strong sense of touch and taste.  Special hairs on the spider’s body contain nerves.  These nerves act as “ears, nose and tongue” to sense danger, as well as to locate food.–Dick Rogers

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Is there a dog that can’t bark?

Yes, there is one breed of dog, the basenji (buh-SEN-jee), that you’ll never catch “barking up the wrong tree.”  This strange little dog with perky ears and a tightly curled tail cannot bark at all.  It does make noises, and whines, and when excited.  It makes a sound resembling a yodel.

The basenji has another feature not found in other breeds of dogs.  It has a habit of washing its short, silky coat with its tongue to keep itself clean, as a cat does.  Because it is not a noisy dog, the basenji is a popular house pet.–Dick Rogers

What is a giant anteater?

Giant Anteater

The giant anteater is an animal that lives in the forests of tropical America.  This toothless animal feeds mainly on ants and termites.  Its tube-like snout is more than a foot long, but its mouth is no wider than the head of a thumbtack.

The anteater gets its meal by ripping open ant and termite nests with its strong claws. Then it pokes out its long, sticky tongue and slurps up the insects it uncovers.  It may eat many thousands of insects at one meal.  The anteater has no permanent home.  It wanders alone searching for food, stepping only to curl up and sleep. – Dick Rogers

How does a frog catch its food?

Frog

All summer long, the little frog squats, motionless, on the bank of a quiet pond or brook and watches for passing insects.

If a fly or cricket passes within reach, the frog’s long tongue will snap out like a flickering ship, so fast that you can scarcely follow the action.  The insect is caught on the sticky tip.  Just as quick as the frog flips its tongue back into its mouth.

The frog’s tongue is fastened at the front of its mouth, not the back, so that it can be flipped out a long way.  The frog’s mouth is equipped with feeble, practically useless teeth,  which are present only in the upper jaw.  So it must live mostly on small creatures that it can swallow in one gulp.

Frogs also eat earthworms, spiders and winnows that they catch in the water.  Toads capture their food in much the same way as frogs do.

Frogs and toads help man by sailing many harmful insects to be found in gardens and on farms.  – Dick Rogers

 

How does a frog catch its food?

Frog

The frogs catches insects and other small food animals on the sticky tip of its long tongue.

All summer long, the little frog squats, motionless, on the bank of a quiet pond or brook and watches for passing insects.  If a fly or cricket passes within reach, the frog’s long tongue will snap out like a flickering whip, so fast that you can scarcely follow the action.

The insect is caught on the sticky tip.  Just as quickly the frog flips its tongue back into its mouth.

The frog’s tongue is fastened at the front of its mouth, not the back, so that it can be flipped out a long way.  The frog’s mouth is equipped with feeble, practically useless teeth, which are present only in the upper jaw.  So it must live mostly on small creatures that it can swallow in one gulp.

Frogs also eat earthworms, spiders and minnows that they catch in the water.  Toads capture their food in much of same way frogs do.  Frogs and toads help man by eating many harmful insects to be found in gardens and on farms. – Dick Rogers

What is an abalone?

Abalone

An abalone is a kind of sea snail useful for its meat and colorful shell.  It is a kind of sea snail that can be found living in most mild seas.

In many places abalones are known as “ear shells” because their single flattened shell somewhat resembles a human ear.

The abalone spends most of its life clinging to submerged rocks with its flat muscular foot.  It can fasten itself to a rock so tightly that only a knife can pry it loose.

It feeds on the plants that it can scrape off the rocks with its rasp-like tongue.  Its hard shell, which may grow from a few inches to nearly a foot long, protects the abalone’s soft body.

Abalone steak, the snail’s large foot, is a popular seafood dish in many countries.  The pearly inner lining of the shell, called “mother-of-pearl,” is used in making buttons and other ornaments.

The abalone builds its shell out of lime from the water.  The shell grows as the abalone grows. – Dick Rogers