Posts tagged ‘Wavelike Motion’

How does a snail move?

Garden Snail

The common snail is slowly inched forward by wavelike motions of its muscular foot.

Almost everyone is familiar with the common garden snail.  Snails are small animals that usually carry their shells on their backs and leave stick trails of goo behind as they creep along.

A snail moves around by creeping on a part of its body that seems to be its stomach.  It is really a broad foot.

The muscles move in a backward, wavelike motion that causes the snail to inch slowly forward.

As the snail moves along, special glands in its foot pour out a slimy fluid that serves as a slippery path to help the snail slide along more easily.

The goo also helps protect the snail’s body as it crawls over sharp twigs and rocks.

As the snail creeps along on its slick pathway, only its head and big foot are out of the shell.

The snail’s eyes are on the tips of its feelers.

To escape dry weather, the snail seals itself inside its shell house with a “door” a dried goo.  – Dick Rogers

 

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How does a slug move?

Slug

A slug is a cautious creature something like a snail, but without a shell.  Slugs are famous for the “sluggish” pace  at which they travel.  You’ve probably seen a slug creeping along on a part of its body that seems to be its stomach.

Actually the bottom part of the slug’s body is really its “foot”.  The muscles in the slug’s foot move in a wavelike motion that causes the slug to glide slowly along.  It leaves a glistening train of slim behind it as it crawls.

This serves as a slippery path to help the slug slide along more easily.  The goo also protects the slug’s body as it crawls over sharp rocks and twigs.

Slugs live in moist places.  They are often found under logs and stones.  Slugs are often garden pests because they eat plants.  To help them eat, the tongue of a slug has hundreds of tiny “teeth”  with which if files away bits of food. – Dick Rogers