Posts tagged ‘White Bird’

Why do we say the stork brings new babies?

The familiar legend that the stork brings new babies arises from the fact that the stork takes loving care of its own young.

When a new baby is born, people sometimes like to say they have had “a visit from the stork.”

The familiar legend that the stork brings new babies from heaven arises from the fact that storks are devoted parents.  They take loving care of their own young.

The only member of the stork family living in North America is the wood ibis, or wood stork, that lives in marshes along the southern coasts of the United States.

Stork

White storks live throughout Europe and Africa.  They are large, white birds with long, red legs and long necks.  They have no voice except for an occasional hiss.

They “speak” to one another by noisily rattling their long, red bills.

These are the storks that like to build large twig nests of chimneys and rooftops.

Many Dutch and German families build stork nests on rooftops and chimneys to attract storks.

A house that storks nest on is considered a lucky house.  Each spring, the birds often return to the same nests to raise their young. – Dick Rogers

What is an albatross?

Albatross

Some birds spend all their time far out at sea, except when they are nesting.  The albatross is one of these birds.

It is a large sea bird resembling an overgrown sea gull.

Albatross are found roving over nearly an ocean except the North Atlantic.

They often follow ships for days and feed on the garbage that is thrown overboard.

Their long, narrow wings, allow them to soar behind a ship for hours with barely a wing beat.

Albatross sit down on the water to eat and scoop up the scraps of food with their yellow, hooked beaks.  They also eat fish.

The best known albatross is the wandering albatross.

This magnificent white bid has the longest wingspan of any living bid.

Though only about nine inches wide, its black-tipped wings may stretch more than 11 feet from tip to tip

An old sailor’s superstition said that harming an albatross bought bad luck.  – Dick Rogers