Posts tagged ‘Burrows’

How does the earthworm dig its hole?

Earthworm

Earthworms are worms that live in warm and moist places throughout the world.

As anyone can guess from their name, earthworms live in the ground.  The earthworm digs its burrow by actually eating its way through the soil.

As the worm digs, it swallows the dirt and digests the decaying plant and food matter in the dirt.

The soil passes through the earthworm’s long body and is left on the ground in little heaps of dirt balls, called castings.  Thus the earthworm makes a home for itself and gets its meals at the same time.

Earthworms are good friends to farmers and gardeners.  By digging burrows, earthworms leave tiny holes in the ground which make it easy for air and water to get to plant roots.

The castings of the worms help keep the soil rich for growing plants.

The earthworm is sometimes called an angleworm or fishworm, because it is a popular bait used by fishermen. – Dick Rogers

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What is a groundhog?

Groundhog

A groundhog is a funny rodent that burrows in the ground. Its stock body may be two feet long.

Groundhogs, also called woodchucks, make their homes in many parts of North America.

All summer the groundhog nibbles grass, roots, and leaves. Bu October, the groundhog is so fast it can hardly walk. When winter comes, it curls up in the burrow and falls into a deep sleep. The stored fat keeps it alive during its sleep.

Some people have a superstition that the groundhog can tell what the weather will be. On the second day of February, it is supposed to wake from its long sleep and stick its head out of its burrow.

If it sees its shadow, it will be frightened and crawl back into its hole. This is supposed to mean that there will be six more weeks of winter.

But if the sun is not shining it will stay out of its burrow and spring will come soon! – Dick Rogers

Why does the dachshund have a long body?

Dachshund

The droopy-eared dachshund (pronounced  DAHKS hoont) is so long and low that it is often jokingly called a sausage dog—half-a-dog high and two dogs long.

The dachshund’s low-slung shape was developed long ago in German for “badger hound.”  Tracking badgers and then wiggling into their dens to draw them out was its business.

A long body and short, sturdy legs, with feet well suited for digging, made the dachshund ideal for this job.  Smaller-sized dachshunds were used for digging rabbits out of their burrows.  The original dachshund from Germany was smooth-haired.

Today, you can see dachshunds with long, silky hair and rough-coated, wire-haired dachshunds, as well as the tiny miniature dachshunds.  The dachshund’s loving nature and shrewd intelligence has made them hang and alert dog a popular pet. – Dick Rogers